Course syllabus

Lecure 1: What is political and what is human-computer interaction?

Lecture 2: Foundations

  • Winner, Langdon. 1985. “Do Artifacts Have Politics?” In The Social Shaping of Technology, edited by Donald MacKenzie and Judy Wajcman, 26–38. Buckingham: Open University Press.
  • Nissenbaum, Helen. 2005. “Values in Technical Design.” In Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics, edited by Carl Mitcham, lxvi–lxx. New York: MacMillan.

  • Muller, Michael J. 2007. “Participatory Design.” In Human-Computer Interaction, edited by Andrew Sears and Julie A. Jacko. CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/9781420088892.
  • Bødker, Susanne. 2006. “When Second Wave HCI Meets Third Wave Challenges.” In Proceedings of the 4th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Changing Roles, 14–18. https://doi.org/10.1.1.96.3754.

Lecture 3: Governments, Representations and Citizens

  • McDonald, Samantha, and Melissa Mazmanian. 2019. “Information Materialities of Citizen Communication in the U.S. Congress.” Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction 3 (CSCW). https://doi.org/10.1145/3359149.
  • Hemphill, Libby, and Andrew J. Roback. 2014. “Tweet Acts: How Constituents Lobby Congress via Twitter.” In Proceedings of the 17th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing - CSCW ’14, 1200–1210. New York, New York, USA: ACM Press. https://doi.org/10.1145/2531602.2531735.
  • Liste, Lucía, and Knut H Sørensen. 2015. “Consumer, Client or Citizen? How Norwegian Local Governments Domesticate Website Technology and Configure Their Users.” Information, Communication & Society 18 (7): 733–46. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2014.993678.

Lecture 4: Publics and social movements

  • Disalvo, Carl. 2009. “Design and the Construction of Publics.” Design Issues, 48–63. https://doi.org/10.1162/desi.2009.25.1.48.
  • Asad, Mariam, and Christopher a. Le Dantec. 2015. “Illegitimate Civic Participation.” Proceedings of the 18th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing - CSCW ’15, 1694–1703. https://doi.org/10.1145/2675133.2675156.
  • Erete, Sheena L. 2015. “Engaging Around Neighborhood Issues.” In Proceedings of the 18th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing - CSCW ’15, 1590–1601. https://doi.org/10.1145/2675133.2675182.

Lecture 5: Democratic Innovations and Participation

  • Nelimarkka, Matti. 2019. “A Review of Research on Participation in Democratic Decision-Making Presented at SIGCHI Conferences. Toward an Improved Trading Zone Between Political Science and HCI.” Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction 3 (CSCW): 1–29. https://doi.org/10.1145/3359241.
  • Chadwick, Andrew, and Christopher May. 2003. “Interaction between States and Citizens in the Age of the Internet: ‘E-Government’ in the United States, Britain, and the European Union.” Governance 16 (2): 271–300.

Lecture 6: Critical accounts

  • Keyes, Os, Josephine Hoy, and Margaret Drouhard. 2019. “Human-Computer Insurrection.” Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - CHI ’19, 1–13. https://doi.org/10.1145/3290605.3300569.

Lecture 7: Synthesis and Future outlook

  • Lupton, Deborah. 2018. “Towards Design Sociology.” Sociology Compass 12 (1): 1–11. https://doi.org/10.1111/soc4.12546.

  • Larson, Christina. 2018. “Who Needs Democracy When You Have Data?” MIT Technology Review, 2018.

  • Alkhatib, Ali, and Michael Bernstein. 2019. “Street-Level Algorithms.” In Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - CHI ’19, 1–13. New York, New York, USA: ACM Press. https://doi.org/10.1145/3290605.3300760.
  • Jansson, Gabriella, and Gissur Ó Erlingsson. 2014. “More E-Government, Less Street-Level Bureaucracy? On Legitimacy and the Human Side of Public Administration.” Journal of Information Technology & Politics 11 (3): 291–308. https://doi.org/10.1080/19331681.2014.908155.